Gear Review: Marmot Isotherm Half-Zip

Gear Review: Marmot Isotherm Half-Zip

Posted by on Jan 30, 2016 in Gear Review & Blog | 0 comments

My favorite pieces of gear are the ones I just wasn’t on board with in the beginning: maybe I don’t understand the function it, maybe I don’t buy into the gimmick (the Airvantage jacket anyone?), or maybe I’m just feeling vain and don’t like the look of a thing. This was exactly the case when I got my hands on a Marmot Isotherm Half-Zip. In my eyes, it had the aesthetics of my grandfathers windbreaker, and had a claim that (at the time) was relatively new to a lot of us: breathable insulation. I was skeptical. And (spoiler) I was wrong. Polartec Alpha, as many of us now know, is a “breathable insulation,” meaning its not designed to be your main, sitting-on-belay puffy, but rather is meant to be put on and left on all day. This is just an extension of a notable trend in outdoor gear of late which is to look for moisture management and breathability as key components to a piece being your backcountry best-friend versus a closest-stuffer. Temperature and moisture regulation, not full-on control, is the name of the game. Its a fine idea, but does it really work? I was hesitant, but as http://www.viagragenericoes24.com/viagra-super-active-plus someone who was constantly shedding layer on my High Peaks hikes I figured “what the hell.” FEATURES (or, a healthy lack-there-of) I went with the Half-Zip over its more burly, and more insulated Full-Zip and Hooded brothers, believing (correctly) that it weighed a lot less and that I likely wouldn’t need that much insulation. Now, the confusing thing was I couldn’t actually tell if the different pieces had different amounts of insulation, but the weight savings between the other jackets and the half-zip was a full 8 oz’s. Unlike Primaloft, which often comes with how many grams of insulation the piece has, I was left to estimate, but I believe my assertion is correct. Unlike its brothers, the Half-Zip is significantly paired down. No cool soft-shell shoulders, no hood (which I honestly never use): a light Pertex shell, a thin amount of Polartec Alpha insulation, a mesh liner (not like your dad’s old windbreaker-mesh–it’s a tighter knit), napoleon zipper (packs into itself), drawcord hem, and a partial elastic cuff. That’s it. And that’s all it needs. I chose the no-hood option because it was undoubtedly going to get layered under or over other things, and the last thing I needed was another errant hood flapping in the breeze or curling up against my neck, whispering “Why have you forsaken me again, father?” The jacket is impressively compressible. It fits nicely into its own pocket without having to cram it in and stress the seams, and has a gear loop to attach it to a harness (great for ice climbing…if you even have to take it off). The half-cuff elastic is absolutely awesome too: I’ve been able to slide it on and off over my thinner ice-climbing and...

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Outdoor Communities

Posted by on Mar 25, 2015 in Gear Review & Blog, Local Resources | 0 comments

Tired of heading off to the woods alone? Looking to make some new friends in the great outdoors? Then check out some of these great local communities! Finger Lakes Running Club  Looking for some motivation to run up all these brutal hills we have? Look no further than the Finger Lakes Running Club, a community of local runners who take to the countless beautiful roads and trails that this town has to offer. Whether you’re looking for casual outings, races on trail or road, or track events, the FLRC has something for you. Made up of everyone from amateur enthusiasts to veteran athletes, you’ll be happy running with this crew no matter where you end up in the pack. Looking to do some races with them? Sign up to be a member! It’s totally worth the price of admission. Cycle CNY For those looking to crank through Ithaca’s many forests, IMBA’s Cycle CNY chapter is the group for you. Group rides, trail maintenance days, http://www.viagragenericoes24.com/donde-comprar-viagra and fun and informative events https://www.acheterviagrafr24.com/viagra-en-france/ will make you feel like a part of your biking community quickly. Cornell Outing Club Don’t let this group’s prestigious Cornell-ian title scare you–everyone’s invited to participate in this club! A dedicated community of fellow fun-loving adventurers, COC is a great group for those looking to share their favorite activities with others, or for those looking to learn an entirely new set of skills. Backpacking/hiking, cycling, canoeing/kayaking, climbing/ice-climbing, scuba diving, caving, xc-skiing–they do it...

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Gear Review: Mountainsmith Mountain LT Shelter

Gear Review: Mountainsmith Mountain LT Shelter

Posted by on Feb 6, 2015 in Gear Review & Blog | 0 comments

Here’s a quick rule of thumb for gear: there’s light-weight, there’s effective, and there’s cheap–and you can normally pick two. Normally is the operative word for this review. I like to find gear that falls somewhere between all these points, and while it’s hard to do, on occasion a certain piece will shine. For me, one of those pieces is Mountainsmith’s Mountain Shelter LT. Now, normally Mountainsmith is not a brand that comes to mind when I think “light,” the brand normally instead conjuring up bombproof, and relatively affordable gear–just not the lightest stuff. However, the specs speak for themselves: The Stats (Copied from their site, ‘cuz I’m lazy)   Capacity: 2 Person Features: Three season tarp Zippered single door, two person layout Sets up with 2 standard trekking poles – 53″H at Front / 40″H at Back Rear ventilation window Reflective guylines with tensionlock cord adjustment Guyout attachment points (top two guyouts enable overhead tree set-up instead of dual trekking pole set-up) Reinforced V-stakes Stuffsack included Details: YKK® Zippers 3M™ Reflective Cord Set-up instructions printed on stuffsack Materials: 40dx244T Nylon Storage Sack 7075 Aluminum V-Stakes -13pcs Tarp: 40d Sil-Nylon Rip Stop PU2000MM F/R Dimensions: 142″ x 54″ x 84″ (360 x 137 x 213 cm) Floor Area: 54 ft² / 5 m² Vestibule Area: Spacious front door area behaves as vestibule Peak Height: 4′ 6″ Trail Weight: 1 lb 15.5 ozs / 0.89 kg Packaged Weight: 2 lbs 1 oz / 0.9 kg Now, while 2lbs (slightly less if you bring your own tent stakes or just use sticks) isn’t the most ultralight, for a shelter it’s pretty good, especially at it’s $129.95 price tag. So, we’ve got affordability and weight dialed in, but what about the effectiveness?   Field Testing    I’ve been using the Mountain Shelter LT for a little over a year now, using it first in winter conditions and later in the spring and summer months. Honestly, the majority of the testing I’ve done has been overnights and test-runs in local woods, as I normally bring the Shelter along as a back-up when I’m hitting lean-tos in the Adirondacks. In a way, though, that’s a great remedy for a common scenario many of us face on more traveled trails: you’re 90% sure you’ll be in a lean-to, but you know you can’t risk the 10%. When traveling with a partner makes a bivie sack ineffective, the Shelter is a great option. Now, setting it up: Mountainsmith gives you easy instructions printed on the stuffsack, but you can swap it out for a compression sack once you practice a few times: stake the back 3 tabs down, place the rear trekking pole, stake the front 3, place the front pole, stake the side tabs, and adjust. Mountainsmith wisely prints the pole measures right onto the side of the shelter, but weirdly–and I hope I’ve got a misprinted tent (someone from Mountainsmith feel free...

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Gear Review: Olicamp Kinetic Titanium Stove

Posted by on Oct 14, 2014 in Gear Review & Blog | 0 comments

While the Jet Boil (check out Ryan’s review here) and the MSR Pocket Rocket have been the tried-and-true reigning stove champs, I always look for underdogs: maybe it’s the hipster in me, but I love those excellent pieces of kit that fly under the radar. Enter Olicamp’s Kinetic Ultra Titanium Stove, a $40-50 investment that strikes the perfect balance between ultra-light, super simple, and affordable.   Construction The Kinetic works just like the canister stoves you know and love: screw it in to an isobutane canister, crank up the gas, flick your lighter, and blast Kenny Loggins’ “Danger Zone” as you go into full over-drive. However, what makes it stand out from other stoves is it’s weight; being constructed from titanium (with an aluminum burn-adjuster), the Kinetic weighs a paltry 1.7 oz’s, making it nearly half the weight of the 3 oz Pocket Rocket. The only thing lighter is the Kinetic’s little brother, the award winning Ion Micro, which shaves .2 oz’s at the cost of some stability. Field Testing The Kinetic’s small size let’s it pack away easily, whether in your cook kit or riding up in your pack’s brain, stowing it away is never an issue. It comes with a plastic carrying case, but I ditched it, instead wrapping mine in a handkerchief; when packed away inside a cook kit all snugly with utensils and sponges and spices, I never have to worry about it getting damaged. Beyond that, the Kinetic http://www.laviagraes.com/viagra-efectos-secundarios performs just like your average canister stove, bringing .5-.8 liters of water to a rolling boil at around 3:30 minutes (give or take depending on conditions). If you’re like me and use a filter to purify water, making a full-boil unnecessary, you’ll be able to save some fuel and time by getting hot enough water for tea and instant meals in about 2:30-3:00 minutes. If you’re a real back-country chef who needs variable burn, you can adjust the flame easily with a turn of the burner-adjustor. The only real downside to the Kinetic is that you have to be careful with your pot: the small arms on the stove don’t make it the most stable platform, so tipping is easy, especially with larger pots. That said, I’ve never actually tipped a pot on the Kinetic, but I definitely am careful with how it sits. If you’ll be doing multi-pitch or multi-day climbing, where your stove will be perched on narrow spaces, stick with a Jetboil. Since the Kinetic uses canisters, it won’t be your go-to for cold weather camping. http://www.viagragenericoes24.com/nombres-de-viagras Since the fuels separate at colder temperatures, you’ll find the Kinetic getting sluggish in the mid 30’s and down; at 20*, it’s like it’s on simmer-mode even when cranked to full burn. There are tricks to get canisters to work at lower temperatures–some of which can turn your stove into a bomb–but I recommend just switching over to a white-gas stove when you...

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Gear Review: Evolv Cruzer Approach Shoe

Posted by on Oct 14, 2014 in Gear Review & Blog | 0 comments

When I’m going out for a day of climbing at a crag, I really don’t like wearing socks. The act of sitting in the dirt while trying to keep your feet, climbing shoes, and socks all free from dirt is just not doing it for me. I was really looking for a shoe that I could wear without socks, and is designed to be without socks, but was more stable than a pair of Sanuks, and until Chaco makes a Z/2 with a vibram dot print on the bottom, I’ll have to settle with something else. Enter the Evolv Cruzer. I noticed a co-instructor wearing these and was immediately interested. I picked up a pair before this years season started up and so far so good. The Cruzer maintaining traction on some descents.  Build: Weighing in at 7.7oz, this shoe is made fully of canvas with a microfiber lining. The laces are actually a stretchy material so when you tie it once, you can slide it on easily and it expands then contracts to the exact tightness you originally tied it at. The footbed is made with microfiber covered memory foam. It has a rubber wrapped heel and toe box similar to other approach shoes. The bottom is a continuous piece of Evolv’s TRAX rubber with an edging platform. Top/Bottom view Performance: I wore these in the New last weekend pretty much the entire time other than actual climbing. As a hiking shoe, it managed the 5-30 minute approaches very nicely. It managed rolling trail and steeper scree very well. Traction was maintained the entire time and not once did I lose footing or feel insecure. I didn’t climb rock in them, but I really felt that I could handle some east to moderate climbs in them. Previous approach shoes I’ve owned  performed well enough to lead 5.8 in North Carolina, and these felt like I could do the same. The have a great feel and fit to them. I can see these being absolutely ideal on long multi-pitch routes. They’d weigh nothing on a harness and are easy enough to slip on for a descent. Fit: These shoes are true to size. Now when I say true to size, I mean that they fit pretty snug, as a good approach/climbing shoe should. I’ve seen quite a few reviews online saying that they are too tight, but if you’re looking for a shoe to wear mostly casually, that can perform a bit when you need it to, size up. Otherwise the size you are will make this shoe perform to the level it needs to, while maintaining wear-ability outside of a climbing/hiking situation. The Cruzer checking out some good water, reading the guidebook, and looking at climbs that are way out of our league.   Overall: After a busy weekend with this shoe, I am thrilled with it. It performed where it needed to and...

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Gear Review: Outdoor Research Whirlwind Hoody

Posted by on Oct 14, 2014 in Gear Review & Blog | 0 comments

I’ve been searching for a lightweight, practical layer that feels good on the skin, and sheds wind and light precipitation. The Outdoor Research Whirlwind is something http://www.laviagraes.com/magnum-drink-viagra I stumbled upon,  and immediately wanted. It is a simply designed lightweight soft shell designed with many uses in mind. I’ve worn it around town, and for a few windy casual bike rides. I will definitely be wearing it climbing year round. Build: It is made from a stretch woven fabric that is a mix of 87% recycled polyester and 13% spandex. As I mentioned it is soft and feels great on the skin over a t-shirt. The stretch allows for excellent range of motion. It is a half-zip pullover soft shell with a hood that’s stretchy enough http://www.viagragenericoes24.com/viagras-naturales to pull over any sized head, and could go over a helmet, but would https://www.acheterviagrafr24.com/prix-viagra-pharmacie/ cause the jacket not to fit properly because it will be pulled up. Fit: Labeled as a Trim Fit, I would agree. I ordered a small which fits me perfectly (~6′, 165lbs, narrow shoulders). The lower half of the jacket fits snug around the waist, which makes it interesting to put on and take off as it gets slightly caught on my upper torso and I have to roll it down. That snug fit will definitely come in handy when wearing a pack or harness, and while lifting arms above your head.  The overall fit is trim, but not restrictive. As soon as you put in on you can https://www.acheterviagrafr24.com/generic-viagra/ just tell that you’ll have full freedom of movement. Features: Two awesome features with the OR Whirlwind. First, is the classic napoleon pocket stuff sack. While wearing the jacket this pocket us the perfect size for a phone and granola bar or two. What is nice about the small size of the pocket is that you know it’ll stuff down nice and small, about the size of a tennis ball, with room to make it even smaller when stuffing into a pack. It also has a loop on it to attach to a harness or backpack for quick weather changes. Second favorite feature is the cuffs at the wrist. Overall the wrist is the perfect fit. Not too tight, but tight enough that it doesn’t move around on you, and they also stay on your arms if you push your sleeves up. Here’s where it gets magical: There is an extra piece of fabric folded over the cuff, that will unfold and become a hand warmer cave of delight on  morning or http://www.viagragenericoes24.com/que-es-diagrama-de-flujo day hikes that are just a bit colder. (See video below for another example) Performance: OR labels this as water and wind resistant. I have not tested this in light rain yet, but it feels and looks water resistant enough to shed light weather. I mostly bought this for the wind-blocking. Even though they say its only wind http://www.viagragenericoes24.com resistant,...

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Gear Review: Outdoor Research Advanced Bivy Review

Posted by on Oct 14, 2014 in Gear Review & Blog | 0 comments

For those looking to go fast-and-light, the bivy sack is a classic…also, the easiest way to feel like you’re sleeping in a damp nylon coffin. Being claustrophobic, my few tests with other bivies always led to me waking up with a flap of nylon trying to suffocate me in my sleep. Your average smart person would give up on the bivy, but that ain’t how I roll. [Puts on sunglasses dramatically] After doing a lot of research, I eventually decided to go with OR’s Advanced Bivy, and after a few months of testing at both ends of the weather spectrum, I can say I’m thoroughly happy with this sleep system. Specs and https://www.acheterviagrafr24.com/viagra-pour-homme/ Design  The Advanced is constructed from a super durable, 30D Nylon ripstop and 3-layer Goretex Respiration Positive; while I do not have the exact stats on hand, it is a highly durable and highly breathable Goretex material that many of us know and love. The floor is constructed from a durable 70D nylon. What makes the Advanced Bivy obviously stand out from others is its hoops. While not necessary for use, the user can place two hoops easily into snap-attached joints: one hoop will keep the hood off your face, raising it 20″ from the ground, while the other gives the hood some structural rigidity, letting you leave it open to vent while still protecting you from above. Now, other companies have hoops, but I found OR’s derlin poles to be light and easy to use; they don’t feel like the strongest poles out there, but truth be told they are luxuries rather buy levitra 5mg daily than necessities. Also, most people won’t be abusing them too much, as they only come out of the pack during sleep time. The bivy is mummy cut (as it should be), starting at 20″ wide at the feet and expanding to 26″ at the hood. At 87″ long (7’4″), you have to be pretty tall to fill this thing up. At 6’1″, I often toe the line of being too tall for some products, but I can only describe this bivy as exceedingly roomy. The bivy is just wide enough to slide your boots and a few accessories next to your pad on either side, which can be strapped down with the included velcro-closure straps. Broader folks may not be able to squeeze accessories next to them, but they should be able to fit in decently (albeit it might get a little cramped). The Advanced also includes a removable no-see-sum mesh netting at the hood, and mesh vent in the footbox that can be unzipped to let air flow and prevent condensation. There are also guy-out and stake loops on the bivy; while I thought this seemed kind of strange at first, I found that staking out the floor of the bivy really keeps it from crumpling up, creating a neater, roomier feel. All...

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Race Report: Thom B Trail Races

Posted by on Oct 14, 2014 in Gear Review & Blog | 0 comments

This past Saturday was the annual Thom B. Trail Race, the opening race of the Finger Lakes Running Club‘s trail series. Fittingly, this race embodied most FLRC trail races I’ve encountered: simple, supportive, and fun. While the Finger Lake’s races aren’t glamorous, they take you through beautiful and technical terrain; there are no cheering crowds or loud music, but the runners themselves are an inspiration to run with. For those who may be jaded with running’s recent turn to gimmicky color runs/mud runs,  the acheter cialis sur internet FLRC races offer a return to simple origins. This year’s Thom B race had an understated excitement, as it was the inaugural addition of the 52k addition to the usual 13k and 26k. While there were only 14 of us running the longer distance, the 120+ racers running the 13/26k were amazingly supportive, as were the various check point workers and the occasional surprise volunteers at the “un-staffed” aid stations. Conditions were hot–mid 70’s and up–and humid like you could not believe, leaving many racers feeling they couldn’t stay hydrated no matter how hard they tried. For me, it took guzzling 3-4 full water bottles per lap to stay even remotely hydrated. With the 52k distance starting earlier in the day, the trails were 50% mud, letting my Inov8 Bare-Grips do what they do best. By the time the 13/26K started, it was sunny any dry (dry being a subjective term here) enough to switch to my Vivobarefoot Breathos. The trail is up-and-down consistently, with a few flat runs to give your some hope and to let you get some steam. The running got a little technical (read: crazy) on some sections of the notoriously half-track Finger Lakes Trail, but this is definitely a race doable http://www.cialispharmaciefr24.com/cialis-hypertrophie-prostate/ by any runner–for experienced trail runners, it’s a http://www.laviagraes.com/viagra-en-tiendas-naturistas fun mix between tough and doable, and for newer runners, it’ll be a great race to test your skills. I bonked hard partway through my http://www.viagragenericoes24.com/nombres-de-viagras third lap, feeling the combined effects of the humidity, mild dehydration, and an IT-Band that decided it didn’t want to run down hills anymore. This race was a particularly lonely one: once the director yelled “Go!” us ultra runners were by ourselves for a solid 2 laps, spreading ourselves all through Hammond.  What killed me was when the 13/26K runners came onto the course: their encouragement was much needed, but I foolishly got caught up in staying with them, forgetting that not only had I just run double their distance, but would continue running after they’re done. The moral of the story: keep your pace.  My saving grace was a runner named Tania, who was running the shorter 26K distance. After her first lap in (my third), she was having a tough time, so we paired up together, chatting to take our minds off of the discomfort. We told each other funny race stories and funny life http://www.laviagraes.com/magnum-drink-viagra stories;...

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Gear Review: Inov8 Baregrip 200

Posted by on Oct 14, 2014 in Gear Review & Blog | 0 comments

Living in Ithaca, NY, a solid 3/4 of my trail runs occur (1) In the rain, (2) In snow, or (3) In the mud (due to #1 and #2). After experimenting with lots of shoes–and slipping around a lot–I decided to try out Inov8’s Baregrip shoes, a wonky specialty piece of gear for minimalist runners looking for maximum traction. Don’t like the bright green fool you: These things will always be the color of mud if you’re using them right. First off, the Baregrips are amazingly light-weight for being such a durable shoe–weighing in at 7oz’s, these could almost be used as camp shoes when backpacking (haven’t tried it yet!). These shoes are likely so light in part due to their super-breathable mesh upper. While many folks who are likely to encounter mud/water may want a Goretex liner in a shoe, Inov8 was smart in aiming for fast draining-and-drying over waterproofing, which would only be less breathable and an equally futile line of defense against wetness. From my experience, after full submersion in a creek they drained out in about a minute. While the mesh is excellent in warm temperatures, be careful if you opt for these in the winter–wet feet and cold temperatures may be a recipe for disaster. Speaking of which, wear socks with these guys: while I love running sockless, there is a seam between the heel-cup and the mesh upper that might be bothersome. Honestly though, conditions that warrant wearing Baregrips will also warrant socks and possibly gaiters to manage debris anyway. Continuing to look at the upper, the metatarsal cage gives this shoe a perfect fit when the laces are snugged up tight, which is an added bonus when you’re tramping through shoe-sucking mud. Look at that mud!…I really, really hope that’s mud… Now, it’s the sole that makes this shoe really stand out: the super aggressive lugs dig amazingly into mud, loose dirt, snow, and slush. On dry sections/hard rock, the lugs may cause pressure points on your feet (one user I know actually grinded a particularly bothersome down with a Dremel), but I found it manageable on short stretches. And that’s the key: these shoes should only be worn when your run will be 80% muddy/wet/loose. If you know you’ll be on more than a mile or two of dry stuff, odds are there might be a better shoe for that day’s run. The fit is the only place I had an issue. I noticed that the shoes are on the narrow side, and that the toe-box is not as typically wide as the average zero-drop shoes. Now, none of this bothered me, as I have slim feet and like a snug shoe. What does drive me absolutely nuts is the tip of the shoe, which another equally frustrated runner described as an “elf shoe point.”  Here’s the thing: the shoes fit me in a 10.5, which is pretty universally my shoe...

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Recipe: No Bake “Mud o’ Heaven” Cookies

Posted by on Oct 14, 2014 in Gear Review & Blog | 0 comments

Note: A recent Harvard study proved all things look classier in square-shaped bowls Inspired by an insane sugar-craving in the Adirondacks Great Range, I dreamed up these cookies with my hiking partner, Scott. They’re easy to make, and most (if not all) of the ingredients can be used for other backcountry meals. I’m sure something like this exists already, so feel free to share your ideas, variations, and other https://www.viagrasansordonnancefr.com/viagra-en-ligne/ recipes in the comments. [All measurements are approximates; serves one hungry camper who “would seriously kill someone for a damn cookie right now”]   Ingredients: 1/3 cup Instant https://www.acheterviagrafr24.com/acheter-viagra-en-ligne/ Oatmeal (unflavored) 1 tbsp Powdered Milk A fist-full of Chocolate Chips (seriously, what unit of measurement do you use for these things?) 1 tbsp Brown Sugar 1 tbsp Peanut Butter Optional: Vanilla Extract, Instant Coffee (for you caffeine-fiends), Dried Banana Chips  Note: You could easily substitute his site the chocolate chips for other snacks you may have on hand (granola bars, protein bars,  trail mix, etc) Directions: Put all ingredients in bowl, add hot water and stir until thick, sticky mass (or, boil small amount of water, add ingredients into pot). Shove in your face, raise your hands up, and scream jubilance to the gods. You could probably do it with cold water too if you needed. By the way, it’ll look like mud. Delicious, delicious mud. This meal is in no way a part of a balanced diet, but if you’re sitting on the side of a bear-infested, humid mountain in the middle of black-fly season, you’re likely not a balanced person. Written by Chris, who is a pretty awful...

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Gear Review: Black Diamond Bolt Pack

Posted by on Oct 14, 2014 in Gear Review & Blog | 0 comments

I was in the market for a while for a pack, a smaller one with a lid closure, and some other things in mind. This was a pack cialis hypertrophie prostate that I was picky about in the search process. When I found the bolt pack, it seemed to have everything I wanted; good size that could be a day hike pack or a cragging pack, lid closure which I feel gives more weather protection to the things inside as well as capable of overstuffing a bit, and BDs new reACTIV suspension was a bonus that I was eager to try. Construction This 24 Liter pack is build with many things in mind. The top loading aspect of this pack is a huge plus because it gives you basically a bucket to dump in sport climbing gear, layers, crampons, and food with no problem at all. The internal drawstring flap has about 4 or 5 inches of height if you need to overstuff. The lid however is fixed on the end which means there is no adjusting it to get it to fit on top of an http://www.laviagraes.com/venta-de-viagra-en-cordoba overstuffed pack, and the lid closing strap is not long enough to cialis generique accommodate a lid that isn’t closed all the way. There is a slightly adjustable front stash pocket to throw a layer in once the heat of the day sets in. I was able to stuff my crampons in it on an alpine climb, but luckily I never ended up using them because it could have been tough to unpack/pack them into the front viagra spain pocket while the pack was full. It does come with two ice axe/trekking pole loops at the bottom and a very nice feature up http://www.viagragenericoes24.com/nombres-de-viagras top to attach them. If you look at the side sinch straps, you’ll notice a little tab the strap runs through. Between that tab and the front stash pocket, the axe fits perfectly and stays put if you need to unbuckle or adjust that strap. The pack weight itself is a little more than you’d expect coming in at 2lbs. The back panel holds most of the weight and I have since taken it out to save weight. It’s kind of a pain in the butt to take out which is why I haven’t put it back in yet. It might be tougher. reACTIV Suspension This is a newer feature that is going into all BD packs now, or at least a good chuck of them. At least they should do all of them since their packs are ski and climbing specific, this feature is perfect for that clientele. What it is basically is a uniform strap connecting both shoulder straps at the bottom, and a connected hip belt, all that can move back and forth with you as you move. Overall I have been very impressed...

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Trip Report: Adirondacks | Great Range (June 23, 2014)

Posted by on Oct 14, 2014 in Gear Review & Blog | 0 comments

Now, I love going solo, but the outdoors are always best shared with others (if only for safety reasons), which is why I was so pumped when my solo trip into the Adirondacks’ Great Range became a last-second team expedition with my buddy, Scott. Our impromptu campsite the first night out After driving all night, we camped out on the road after cracking my trusty Subaru’s front sway bar on a rocky dirt road (casualties are to be expected), and then headed out to park at the popular Garden Lot, which only had about three or so spaces when we arrived at 7:30 am. The lesson: get there, early. SET A COURSE FOR ADVENTURE! We decided to take the recently abandoned South trail going from the Garden Lot to Wolf Jaw Lean-To, where we’d make camp. In spite of being abandoned, the South trail is still relatively easy to follow: some sections are washed out and required some scrambling up loose rock and dirt; don’t worry, it only requires mild critical thinking. The hike along the South trail is a great one, following the beautiful and often scenic flow of the Johns Brook. After making camp at the Wolf Jaw Lean-To and meeting a hilarious, friendly, and thoughtful French-Canadian diesel mechanic, we headed out to climb Upper Wolf Jaw and the Gothics. While the view on top of Upper Wolf Jaw is an understated one as far the Adirondacks are concerned, the climb up was fun: your average up-hill slog, with short technical sections of scrambling up rocky slabs that almost bordered on bouldering. Thankfully, these sections were not dangerously exposed or high, so they added a nice change of pace. On top of Upper Wolfjaw From there, the path to Armstrong and Gothics was a straightforward up-and-down over some small rises, ending on ou acheter du cialis en france the sunbaked, panoramic peak. While we had hoped to do Saddleback as well, the heat and lack of available water sources made that a really bad idea, so being responsible we slid down the cables (a welcome installation) and headed down the large slab that is the Orebed Brook, which thankfully had some ladders installed to make the trip down a wee bit easier. Armstrong Gothics Our night ended with a quick dip in the Wolfjaw Brook, which was a terrible idea consider the state of the blackflies. Oh, did I mention that the black flies tore us literal and proverbial “new ones”? God I hate black flies… “Do a flip!” The next morning took us up Haystack by way of Slantrock. On the trail, we met a nice guy named Mike, who at first seemed like your average kinda-goofy 50-something, who we slowly learned was an American bad ass: an Army explosives and http://www.viagragenericoes24.com/viagra-spain ordinances expert, to be precise. He had tons of stories to tell, a lot of them absolutely hilarious. We split ways to...

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Tips & Tricks: Reflectix Pad

Posted by on Oct 8, 2014 in Gear Review & Blog | 0 comments

Meet my oldest friend   Normally with every gear choice there comes sacrifice: Cheap or Light? Comfort or Deadweight? These are the little choices we make every time we assemble our kit, balancing weight and our wallets, and determining if bringing that http://www.viagragenericoes24.com/como-se-compra-el-viagra extra lantern for a cozy camp is worth the weight on the trail. That’s why I get so excited over the little things–those tricks and fixes that offer outstanding comfort, utility, versatility, at no cost or weight. And there is none better than the Reflectix pad. The little pad you see above–cut from a car window shade, reinforced with duct tape (you can buy ‘em at any Walmart or auto shop, but veteran savers always hit up Ollies for their camping needs)–has been on A LOT of adventures. Whether acheter viagra backpacking, climbing, or just dirt-bagging it in Chateau le Goat (my car), the reflectix pad always has a place in my kit.   It’s main use is to offer you a pad to sit/stand on so you don’t get dirty and wet, and the reflective nature of it does offer a little warmth. While I’m not fancy enough to carry an inflatable sit pad with me, I do often want a dry butt. And when changing my clothes or my boots, I dread the weird shuffle dance one invariably does to keep mud and rocks off your clean socks or feet. When I’m in my hammock, it goes right underneath so I can step down and stay dry no matter what, and when tarping it or sleeping in the bivy it goes under my bag’s footbox to lengthen my pad. When on the trail, it gets stuffed away in a waterbottle pocket with a Nalgene, always ready to come to my aid. And–as with most things–there’s the McGuyver factor that must be considered. I’ve used it as a pot grabber, as a mug coozy to keep my tea warm on subzero winter nights, and as a pad to fill in gaps on cool nights in my hammock. I imagine you could use it as a rescue signal too, should it come to that, but try to avoid that (I hear helicopter rides are expensive nowadays). For http://www.laviagraes.com/compro-viagra-en-barcelona almost no cost and no weight, little weightless comforts like this go a long way when you’re roughing it! —————————————————————- Written by Chris, who has to change his pants in strange places often, many of which are not ideal for touching the ground/floor/truck-stop-bathroom-floOR-OH-GOD-IS-THAT-URINE?!-WHY-IS-THERE-SO-MUCH-URINE-ON-THIS-FLOOR?! with bare...

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Gear Review: Patagonia Ascensionist 35

Posted by on Oct 7, 2014 in Gear Review & Blog | 0 comments

Now this something that I have been waiting to buy and to review. As a geek of Patagonia stuff, when they came out with technical hard goods (for the first time!), I got quite excited. I knew the Tetons would be an excellent proving ground for such a pack, and I’ve used it almost exclusively ever since I bought it. The pack comes in three sizes, 25L, 35L, and 45L. The 25 has a very different construction than the bigger two, so this review is for the 35, and could have similar pros and cons as the 45L. Construction: The pack is made from a 210-denier nylon double ripstop and a 400-denier nylon ripstop that is treated with a polyurethane coating and a DWR finish. What all that nonsense means is that they built this pack to be super durable and something that will stand up to weather, rough granite, and dirt and mud. The outside of the pack is a simple design, with mostly just some daisy chains and a sleeve for ice axe(s) instead of the traditional loops hanging down. The waistbelt has a sliding pad that also has some gear loops on it to keep things in handy on a climb. The waist belt is even removable, and you can сialis generique do so very quickly and efficiently. The “lid” is a brand new design in packs. From videos I’ve seen about the pack, Patagonia recruited their entire alpine climbing team to help design this. Steve House talks about the lid design, in that it is quicker, more efficient, and streamlined than conventional lid designs. It is basically a double asymmetrical pull-string closure. The bottom one opens out wide and closes towards the wearers back, while the top lid opens high and wide, allowing you to stuff anything into the pack, and then closes forward to keep weather out. See pictures. There is also a top zipper compartment that is oriented differently as well. Having the vertical zip, it allows you to always be able to reach in and grab anything in there, as opposed to releasing a lid in order to reach whats tucked away. Simple, but genius. Performance: I have worn this thing climbing, scrambling, and hiking. Loaded up to the max and fairly empty. It has performed exceptionally acheter viagra wiki at everything I’ve put it through. It climbs very very well and really moves with the user. The inside back panel can be removed really easily, and put back easily, which is something alpine pack makers have not figured out how to do yet. When removed, you can really move well with a balanced load still. I have worn this pack with waist belt removed on a 10 hour rock climb, and was comfortable the entire time. I even climbed one of the most terrifying pitches of alpine rock with it on…granted...

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